Comeuppance on canvas

I wonder what our evangelical PM Scott Morrison would make of this passage from Revelation 11:18 (KJV)

18 “And the nations were angry, and thy wrath is come, and the time of the dead, that they should be judged, and that thou shouldest give reward unto thy servants the prophets, and to the saints, and them that fear thy name, small and great; and shouldest destroy them which destroy the earth.”

One would hope it would give him pause next time he feels the need to brandish a fist full of coal in parliament.

My initial idea for an entry in the Manifest exhibition was something more personal at first, exploring what was behind feelings that made themselves known at unexpected moments. Pretty straight forward really, I had it all worked out with so much ground to cover here: melancholy, betrayal, euphoria, rejection et al.

vinyl record scratch

Just before I put paint to canvas I had a dream that had an extraordinary impact on me for several days. I couldn’t stop thinking about it and decided to completely change the subject of my painting to something that bubbled to the surface as I slumbered.

"Violent Crumble" though apocalyptic in nature isn't particularly doom-ridden to view at all with bright, warm colours, a vibrant and lively feel and ultimately the heavy black lines in the top half of the composition evoke stained glass windows of a church where, perhaps, the events of this end-of-days scenario were foretold.
Violent Crumble, acrylic on canvas 76cm x 76cm.

“Violent Crumble” is a graphic composition pulled directly from a nightmare where I found myself outrunning a vicious bushfire to get to a soon to be engulfed home to pack clothes, photos and a few keepsakes and flee to an emergency community hall.
Along the roadside farmers were ploughing through baked plates of topsoil which were crumbling into the sky with the wind.
This was the powerful image that stuck with me.
I was witnessing the ultimate scorched earth scenario unfolding as I searched for loved ones among the ashen-faced crowd in the hall.

I have a self imposed rule of always using “blacks” that I have mixed from primary colours, but broke this rule for this graphic painting.

Still, the work isn’t particularly doom-ridden to view at all with bright, warm colours, a vibrant and lively feel and ultimately the heavy black lines in the top half of the composition evoke stained glass windows of a church where, perhaps, the events of this apocalypse were foretold.

Who says that nothing interesting ever happens in Mont Albert?

Manifest exhibtion has been extended until 10 January 2020.

So why not come out to the leafy ‘burbs? You’re welcome to wander in and view the works from 10:30am to 4pm weekdays at 345 Art Creative, 345 Mont Albert Road, Mont Albert. There are plenty of shady two hour parking spots right next to the gallery.

Ciao,

RenĂ©e